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The Broadcaster

The Broadcaster was Anderson Bible Training School's first newsletter for an audience outside the school, excluding Echoes, the annual yearbook. Beginning in 1929, it circulated among alumni, prospective students, Church of God pastors, and donors to the school. It was published on a semi-monthly basis for six years, ending in 1935.

The Broadcaster began as a publication of Anderson Seminary, though it included information about the Bible school and the Church of God movement. In October 1929 (Vol. 1, No. 7), The Broadcaster began to be published by both Anderson College and Anderson Seminary.

Throughout its run, Dr. John A. Morrison served as editor-in-chief in addition to his duties as president. E.S. Reynolds was the managing editor until April 1933, when Ruth Benson took over the position.

The newsletter's name was chosen by the student body. In the end, the honor went to Reda Roop and Eunice Morrison, President Morrison's wife, who both suggested variations on the name The Broadcaster.

By its second year of publication, The Broadcaster had approximately 3,000 subscribers from several countries, including Egypt, the British West Indies, and India. Its content consisted of seminary and alumni news, fundraising campaigns, quotes, poetry, short stories, and editorials. 

Though it ran for only six years, The Broadcaster covered several notable events in Anderson University's early history. These included the controversy surrounding Dr. R. R. Byrum, The Great Depression's impact on the school, and the resolutions in 1934 that called for the college to shut down. In the midst of the 1934 controversey, the publication played a large role in garnering support for the continuation of the college and the liberal arts curriculum. The Broadcaster's regular reporting involved stories on new faculty, incoming, current, and graduating students, the school's endowment, Church of God News, Christian higher education, and theology.

In 1938, a new alumni publication titled Alumni News appeared.